Amazon Adventure 3D

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Yara, with hair adornments made of seeds and macaw feathers.
Image attribution
Sebastião Salgado
Enhance Your IMAX Experience

Start your visit with the visually stunning Amazon Adventure 3D—an immersive IMAX movie that transports viewers to the lush Amazon rainforest. After the movie, visit the the critically acclaimed exhibition Amazônia, featuring more than 200 breathtaking photographs by world-renowned Brazilian photojournalist Sebastião Salgado.

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Amazon Adventure 3D: A True Story of Scientific Discovery key art featuring Henry Bates and Amazonian animals
Image attribution
SK Films
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Amazon horned frog camouflages with the leaves on the Amazon Rainforest floor.
Image attribution
SK Films

NOW PLAYING—Amazon Adventure 3D tells the epic, true story of explorer Henry Bates' fascinating 11-year journey through the visually stunning and biodiverse Amazon rainforest as a young man who risks his life for science in the 1850's. 

Filmed on location in the lush Amazon region, Amazon Adventure 3D is a compelling detective story of peril, perseverance and, ultimately, success. Join Henry Bates as he unearths clues leading to his major discovery of the phenomenon of mimicry—where certain animals adopt the look of others to help them deceive predators and gain an advantage to survive.

Little known to the public, Bates made other crucial contributions to biology: identifying 8,000 species new to science and most importantly, putting forth the first ever case for the creation of a new species, which Charles Darwin called the "beautiful proof" for natural selection.

Audiences will be wowed by the mind-boggling examples of camouflage and mimicry and inspired by Bates' endless curiosity and determination to explore the wilds of nature from the time he was a young boy. Runtime: 45 mins.

Buy Tickets

Showtimes View Details

NOW - JANUARY 8
10:00 a.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
3:00 p.m.

JANUARY 9 - FEBRUARY 20
9:30 a.m. (only available for weekday group reservations)
11:30 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.

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Amazon Adventure 3D award laurels placed on dark green lush leaf background.
Official Movie Trailer
View Video
Henry Bates explores the Amazon Rainforest
Image attribution
SK Films
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Various butterfly species are displayed in a box
Image attribution
SK Films

Henry Bates found species such as these butterflies to be exceptionally similar, but very different.

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Henry Bates reads a letter
Image attribution
SK Films

Always learning, always thinking. Henry Bates always asked why.

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Flower or hunting spider? This spider uses mimicry to disguise itself.
Image attribution
SK Films

Flower or hunting spider? This hunting spider uses mimicry to disguise itself.

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Potoo bird sits atop a tree trunk, disguising itself.
Image attribution
SK Films

This potoo bird matches the tree trunk it's resting on. Potoos are related to nightjars—the family that includes nighthawks and whip-poor-wills.

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The leaf butterfly appears to look like a leaf on an branch.
Image attribution
SK Films

Can you spot the butterfly? This leaf butterfly appears to look like a leaf on an branch.

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A sloth swims in the Amazon Rainforest.
Image attribution
SK Films

Sloths are strong swimmers. They can swim three times faster than they can walk on land. And because of their ability to slow their heart rates to one-third its normal rate, they can also hold their breath for 40 minutes under water.

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Bright orange cock-of-the-rock bird perches in a tree.
Image attribution
SK Films

True to its name, the cock-of-the-rock bird frequents rocky cliffs and ravines close to forest streams. Its genus name, Rupicola, is derived from Latin words meaning rock or cliff inhabiting, a nod to this bird's preferred nest sites.

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Bird sits on a giant lily pad on Amazon River.
Image attribution
SK Films

Bird sits on a giant lily pad on Amazon River.

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Various butterfly species are displayed in a box
Image attribution
SK Films

Henry Bates found species such as these butterflies to be exceptionally similar, but very different.

Image
Henry Bates reads a letter
Image attribution
SK Films

Always learning, always thinking. Henry Bates always asked why.

Image
Flower or hunting spider? This spider uses mimicry to disguise itself.
Image attribution
SK Films

Flower or hunting spider? This hunting spider uses mimicry to disguise itself.

Image
Potoo bird sits atop a tree trunk, disguising itself.
Image attribution
SK Films

This potoo bird matches the tree trunk it's resting on. Potoos are related to nightjars—the family that includes nighthawks and whip-poor-wills.

Image
The leaf butterfly appears to look like a leaf on an branch.
Image attribution
SK Films

Can you spot the butterfly? This leaf butterfly appears to look like a leaf on an branch.

Image
A sloth swims in the Amazon Rainforest.
Image attribution
SK Films

Sloths are strong swimmers. They can swim three times faster than they can walk on land. And because of their ability to slow their heart rates to one-third its normal rate, they can also hold their breath for 40 minutes under water.

Image
Bright orange cock-of-the-rock bird perches in a tree.
Image attribution
SK Films

True to its name, the cock-of-the-rock bird frequents rocky cliffs and ravines close to forest streams. Its genus name, Rupicola, is derived from Latin words meaning rock or cliff inhabiting, a nod to this bird's preferred nest sites.

Image
Bird sits on a giant lily pad on Amazon River.
Image attribution
SK Films

Bird sits on a giant lily pad on Amazon River.

Slider info
A family wearing 3D glasses and watching a film in the IMAX theater
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